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FRENCH 304 A: Issues And Perspectives In French And Francophone Studies

Meeting Time: 
MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
Location: 
THO 325
SLN: 
15121
Instructor:
photo
Geoffrey Turnovsky

Syllabus Description:

Autumn 2018
French 304: Issues and Perspectives in French Studies

THO 325

MW 3:30-5:20

Course description: What is “French Studies?” What are the forms of knowledge and the types of skills that a student majoring or minoring in French can expect to acquire? This course aims both to provide answers to those questions and give students an opportunity to acquire some of that knowledge and to apply the skills in question. We'll accomplish this through discussions on scholarly and historical readings and in a number of hands-on workshops -- on translation, traditional and digital editing, and working with historical archival materials, etc -- in which we'll apply language and analytic skills in concrete ways.

Course objectives: Introduce students to the wide variety of objects that come under the heading of French and Francophone Studies; give students the skills to understand those objects and the tools to express that understanding. Students will be introduced to the major fields of inquiry in French Studies. Students will learn to conduct research in French Studies using libraries as well as digital search engines and archives. Students will have the opportunity to construct, research, annotate, write and peer review a research paper and bibliography in French Studies.

Texts: Readings will be accessible via the course Canvas website.

 

Responsibilities/assignments:

  1. Written work: this will consist of a range of different exerices, assigned in Canvas, done at home or begun in class, and uploaded to Canvas. These include simple questions on the reading, exercises relating to a research project,or completing workshop activites (on translation, eg) started in class. Grading methods on these will vary: from simply checking for completion to being graded on a scale from 1 to 10. The directions will make it clear. 
  1. Two quizzes: simple, short quizzes that serve as "contrôles de lectures." If you've kept up to the reading and come to class, you'll be fine.
  1. A final paper of about 1200 words. This is a mini-research paper that follows protocols we will discuss in class. You will also submit an outline and two drafts of this paper: for peer review and for final proof-reading.
  1. Class activities and participation. This includes: regular participation in discussions and activities; in-class writing activities (beyond what is indicated on the syllabus); as well as an oral presentation at the end of the quarter.

 

Final grade:

Written exercises: 30%

Two quizzes: 20% (10% each)

Final essay: 35%. Total 50 pts, broken down as 5 for outline; 5 for the 1st draft; 5 for comments on classmates' papers; 5 for proofreading; 30 for final paper (graded for argument, organization, evidence, format and language).

Class participation: 15% (of which 7.5% for the oral exposé).

 

Absence policy: Regular attendance is the only way to ensure you get the most from and succeed in the course. There will be regular in-class assignments. Many of these will count towards your participation grade.

Plagiarism: In flagrant cases of a student passing someone else’s work off as their own, I will follow the UW policy on plagiarism. However if you are unclear about the difference between citing (we all cite others’ work!) and plagiarizing, please do talk to me. https://depts.washington.edu/grading/pdf/AcademicResponsibility.pdf. As it happens, we will talk about how citation conventions have developed over time. 

Accommodations: Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the office of Disability Services which coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities: http://www.washington.edu/admin/dso/.

 

Course documents:

GRADE SCALE (from percentage to 4.0)

Syllabus (PDF)

 

Librarian: Deb Raftus (draftus@uw.edu; French Studies guide: http://guides.lib.uw.edu/research/french)

Special Collections Curator: Sandra Kroupa (skroupa@u.washington.edu; Books Arts and Rare Books guide: http://guides.lib.uw.edu/friendly.php?s=research/bookarts)

Useful Resources Page

 

Catalog Description: 
For students majoring or minoring in French. Introduces objects study (literature, cinema, popular culture, etc.) and forms of knowledge, methods of analysis, and types of skills to be acquired. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENCH 302. Offered: ASp.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 25, 2018 - 8:27am
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