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FRENCH 202 A: Intermediate French

Meeting Time: 
MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Location: 
THO 211
SLN: 
15323
Instructor:
William Mitchell

Syllabus Description:

French 202A

Syllabus

Autumn 2017

M-F 12:30-1:20, THO 211

Instructor: William Mitchell, Ph.D.

Email: wcmitch@uw.edu

Phone:

Office and Office Hours:

Moodle Enrollment Key: french202Aautumn17

French Films Enrollment Key: frenchfilms

 

Course description:

French 201-202-203 is a three-part intermediate sequence aiming to develop students’ four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) up to the B1 proficiency level on the CEFR scale (see detailed targets at the end of syllabus). French 200 is taught through a task-based approach. This methodology entails exclusive use of French in class and focuses on communicative skills, fostering a highly interactive class in which the language is contextualized and emphasis is placed on meaning as well as forms. 

Textbook and Instructional Materials:

Required: Entre Nous 3, Éditions Maison des Langues ($47.95 at UW Bookstore)  

Recommended: Espace Virtuel - http://espacevirtuel.emdl.fr

Course grade:

  1. Unit quizzes (3):             30%
  2. In-class compositions (3):                         20%
  3. Final exam: 10%
  4. Moodle homework                         10%
  5. Other homework             5%
  6. Pop quizzes (3)             5%
  7. Oral interview                         5%
  8. Participation                         15%    
  9. Unit Quizzes (30%):

There will be a 20-25 minute vocabulary and grammar quiz at the end of each unit covered (out of 50 points). Quiz dates are indicated in the course calendar, and there will be no make-ups except for documented medical or other emergencies.

  1. In-class Compositions (20%):

Each unit quiz will be followed by a 20-25 minute composition on a related topic. The first two compositions will include student rewrites at home (for 10 out of 50 points). The third and final composition will be one draft only (out of 40 points). (See rubric at the end of syllabus).

  1. Final exam (10%):

The final exam is comprehensive, and may thus include any and all vocabulary, grammar and cultural material covered throughout the quarter. It will take place on Saturday after the last day of classes.

  1. Moodle Homework (10%):

Online homework is assigned and to be completed on a regular basis through Moodle. If students experience any difficulties using the online platform, they must notify their instructor immediately and include a screenshot of the problem they are experiencing. All Moodle assignments must be completed by 8 AM on the day of the quiz, and the final grade is calculated on both timely completion and accuracy.

  1. Other Homework (5%):

Students are expected to study and keep up with the material regularly outside of class. Besides completing computer-graded exercises on Moodle, students will periodically receive instructor-graded assignments (labelled “IG”) to be turned in in class on specific dates. These assignments are graded as follows: 100% (completed, on time and meets expectations), 50% (does not meet expectations), 0% (missing). There will be a 20% penalty for each late day.

  1. Pop quizzes (5%):

3 very short pop quizzes will be given throughout the quarter with or without advance notice. These can cover any vocabulary, grammar or cultural material studied previously and pertaining to the unit under which the pop quiz falls.  

  1. Oral Interview (5%):

The oral interview will be scheduled with the instructor outside of class (generally during the last week of the quarter). The interview will be conducted in pairs and lasts about 15 minutes. It is divided into three parts:

  1. The instructor asks a series of different personal questions to each student (»2 mins./student).
  2. Each student improvises a different monologue on a familiar subject drawn randomly (»2 mins./student).
  3. The students conduct a role-play based on a scenario drawn from a deck of cards. (»3 minutes).

If you and/or your partner are unable to keep your appointment, it is your responsibility to notify your instructor in advance to reschedule the interview. (See rubric at the end of syllabus).

  1. Participation (15%):

Learning a language in a classroom setting is meant to be a highly involved and interactive process. Regular attendance and active participation are essential for performing well and making steady progress. While students are only required to attend the first two days of classes in order to maintain registration, participation is impossible unless you continue to attend. The participation grade is calculated using a daily points system, where each day of class is worth 2 points (100 points total in Autumn 2017). Students earn 1 point for being present, and 1 point for participating actively. Depending on the day’s activities, active participation may include any and all of the following:

  • Being on time for class and ready to start;
  • Having your textbook and any other required materials for the day;
  • Completing all homework assignments on time;
  • Volunteering frequently during in-class activities;
  • Fully engaging in any group or individual work as directed by instructor;
  • Using French to the best of your ability;
  • Showing and maintaining a positive, respectful attitude toward your classmates, instructor and yourself.

Any use of racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, xenophobic, classist, or generally offensive language in class or submission of such material will not be tolerated

***

Anyone who wishes to contest a grade on a particular assignment or exam must

consult his/her instructor within 7 days after the assignment was returned to them

 

***

Academic Standards:

Students are expected to maintain a high standard of academic ethics, honesty and integrity.  Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to: plagiarism, cheating, harassment, and disruptive or offensive behavior (see statement above), and will not be tolerated.  Please refer to the University’s Student Conduct Code. Any student or situation found to be in violation of proper academic conduct will be addressed according to University policy.

Policy regarding cell phones and computers:

Please turn off your cell phone when you come to class.  Simply using the “vibrate” function is still distracting to other students.  Additionally, the use of electronics of any kind is not allowed in the classroom. Exceptions can be made for documented learning accommodations (see “Access and Accommodations” below).

Policy Regarding Student Concerns:

Please see your instructor about your concerns as soon as possible. If you are not satisfied with the response you receive, you may contact Lorenzo Giachetti, French 200 Coordinator, in Padelford C-246 or at giachetl@uw.edu. If you are still not satisfied with the response you received, you may contact Geoffrey Turnovsky, Chair, in Padelford C-255 or at gt2@uw.edu. For your reference, these procedures are posted on the French Studies Bulletin Board, next to Padelford C-254.

Access and Accommodations

Your experience in this class is important to us, and it is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law. Disability Resources for Students (DRS) offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students experiencing a wide range of temporary and permanent disabilities and/or health conditions that may impact their ability to perform well in the classroom. These include but are not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts. If you are experiencing any such difficulties, please contact DRS as soon as possible. Once you have established accommodations, please submit them to your instructor at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs and success in this course.

 

Other Resources

Health and Wellness – (206) 543-2684 – Health and Wellness is a starting point for students in distress and in need of multiple levels of support. We provide intervention, assessment and consultation to students directly and work with faculty/staff to respond to incidents that cause concern in the classroom or beyond. We are not mental health providers but we do work closely with partners like the Counseling Center and Hall Health to make sure students are connected to services when appropriate.

The Counseling Center – (206) 543-1240 – Our staff of psychologists and mental health counselors are available to provide culturally-responsive short-term counseling to students, as well as serving as a consultation and outreach resource for the entire UW community.  All UW Seattle students who are in degree-seeking programs are eligible for our counseling services. No matter where you are from, who you worship, or who you love – if you need to talk, we are here for you.

Hall Health Mental Health – (206) 543-5030 – Hall Health’s Mental Health Clinic provides a high-quality, evidence-based care to UW students, including individual and group counseling and medication evaluation and management. As a student, you are eligible for no-cost drop-in appointments for mental health referrals, as well as light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Not all services are no-cost, but HHMH accepts most major insurance carriers.

UW Leadership Without Borders – (206) 685-630 – The LWB Center works to serve and empower undocumented students at the University of Washington. LWB offers leadership development resources, college success navigators, the Husky Dream Lending Library, a space for community building, and connections to other campus and community resources.

 


 

Course calendar

(French 202 Autumn 2017):

 

Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

(Sept 27)

 

 

Intro

Unité 4

Unité 4

Oct 2

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Oct 9

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Oct 16

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Quiz/Compo 4

Unité 5

Oct 23

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Oct 30

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Nov 6

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Quiz/Compo 5

Veterans Day

Nov13

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Nov 20

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Thanksgiving

Nov 27

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Unité 6

Dec 4

Unité 6

Quiz/Compo 6

Review

Review

Review

 

 

Final exam: Saturday, December 9, 2017

10:30-12:20

Location T.B.A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of French and Italian Studies

Grading Scale for Language Courses – No Curve

 

Percentage

Point

Letter

100-96.5

96.4-94.5

94.4-92.5

4.0

3.9

3.8

A

92.4-91.5

91.4-90.5

90.4-89.5

3.7

3.6

3.5

 

A-

89.4-88.5

88.4-87.5

87.4-86.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

 

B+

86.4-85.5

85.4-84.5

84.4-83.5

3.1

3.0

2.9

 

B

83.4-82.5

82.4-81.5

81.4-80.5

80.4-79.5

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.5

 

B-

79.4-78.5

78.4-77.5

77.4-76.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

 

C+

76.4-75.5

75.4-74.5

74.4-73.5

2.1

2.0

1.9

 

C

73.4-72.5

72.4-71.5

71.4-70.5

70.4-69.5

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

 

C-

69.4-68.5

68.4-67.5

67.4-66.5

1.4

1.3

1.2

 

D+

66.4-65.5

65.4-64.5

64.4-63.5

1.1

1.0

0.9

 

D

63.4-62.5

62.4-59.5

0.8

0.7

D-

59.4-0.0

0.0

E

 

 (rev. 10/9/2016)

 

 

French 200 – Composition Grading Rubric

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Structure/Ideas (circle one)

0 – 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Text is relevant to assigned topic; adequate length and development of topic; can describe facts, events or experiences; can express ideas, feelings and/or reactions to events; makes use of connectors to tie a series of short, simple, and distinct elements into a cohesive discourse.

Comments:

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Vocabulary (circle one)

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Shows effective word choice and use of known vocabulary; shows mastery of elementary and relevant intermediate vocabulary. Word spelling and punctuation are mostly correct and easy to follow, and meaning is not obscured. 

Comments:

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Grammar (circle one)

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Shows mastery of simple sentence structure and of most common complex structures; shows control over appropriate verb tenses and modes; shows control over grammatical spelling (conjugation, accents, number and gender, pronouns, etc.)

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

First Draft Grade

0 – 27

28 – 31

 

 

32-34

35-37

38-40

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Correction (circle one)

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

All errors and/or suggestions made by instructor were addressed.

 

 

Final Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Final Grade

0 – 34.5

35 – 39.5

40 – 44.5

45 – 47

47.5 – 50

 

French 200 – Oral Interview Grading Rubric

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Instructor’s Questions

0 – 3

3.5

4

4.5

5

Can respond comfortably to personal questions, or questions on a familiar subject; can provide information and/or explanation about personal interests, past actions and future plans.

Notes:

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Monologue

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Can quickly express an informed opinion and/or elaborate upon a familiar subject; can make use of and connect a series of short, simple, and distinct elements in a mostly clear and straightforward discourse.

 

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Role Play

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Can handle and adapt discourse to an everyday life interaction; can quickly react to, follow-up on or comment on another point of view.

 

Notes:

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Vocabulary

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Demonstrates a solid range of vocabulary learned in class; makes errors expressing more complex ideas and discourse.

 

Notes:

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Grammar

0 – 6.5

7

7.5

8

8.5

9

9.5

10

Shows mastery of basic sentence structure and of most common complex structures learned in class; shows command over appropriate verb tenses and modes despite marked influences from native language.

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Pronunciation

0 – 3

3.5

4

4.5

5

Pronounces words and sentences intelligibly and clearly, while occasionally pausing.

 

Notes:

 

 

Poor

Fair/Average

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Total

0 - 34.5

35 – 39.5

40 – 44.5

45 – 47

47.5 – 50

 

 

 

Major in French Studies

Fifty-five (55) approved credits above French 203 are required. A minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA is required for courses applied to the French major.

Courses

  • Core: 30 credits from FRE 301, 302, 304, 305, 306 + one course at the 370-level (FRE 376 or 378). 304, 305 and 306 may be taken out of sequence.
  • Electives: 25 credits above FRE 203 (excludes FRE 227, 234, 237, 297, 299, 327 and 337)
  • Minimum 10 credits of electives at the 400-level
  • 15 credits of approved study-abroad coursework may be petitioned to apply to the major

Prerequisites

  • FRE 203 for 301, 376, and 378
  • FRE 301 for 302 (must be taken in sequence)
  • FRE 302 for 304, 305, 306 (enrollment in 302 may be concurrent with the survey course)
  • At least one of FR 304, 305, 306 must be completed prior to enrolling in a 400-level course

 

Minor in French Studies

Thirty (30) approved credits above French 203 are required. A minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA is required for courses applied to the French minor.

Courses

  • FR 301, 302 + one of FRE 304, 305, or 306 + one course at the 370-level (FRE 376 or 378)
  • 10 credits above FRENCH 203 (excludes FRENCH 227, 234, 237, 297, 299, 327, and 337)
  • 10 credits of approved study-abroad coursework may be petitioned to apply to the minor

Prerequisites

  • FRE 203 for 301, 376, and 378
  • FRE 301 for 302 (must be taken in sequence)
  • FRE 302 for 304, 305 or 306 (enrollment in 302 may be concurrent with the survey course)

Please contact the Academic Adviser, Sabrina Tatta, at sabri@uw.edu with any questions about French major or minor.

 

Catalog Description: 
Designed to bring students to an intermediate level of proficiency. Emphasis on experiencing the language in context through a multi-media approach. Second in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: FRENCH 201.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
November 14, 2017 - 10:21pm
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