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FRENCH 101 G: Elementary French

Meeting Time: 
MTWThF 11:30am - 12:20pm
Location: 
THO 334
SLN: 
15294
Instructor:
William Mitchell

Syllabus Description:

French 101

Syllabus

AUTUMN 2017

 

                               Instructor: William Mitchell

                               Email: williamchristophermitchell@gmail.com

                               Phone: 206 390-2751

                               Office and office hours: Padelford C 234 M/W 10:30-11:20

MFL class code: CRSKLNJ-587441


Course Description:

 

French 101-102-103 is an intensive sequence for beginning students. The French 100 series aims to develop students’ four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) up to the A2 proficiency level on the CEFR scale (see detailed targets in syllabus). French 100 is taught through a task-based approach. This methodology entails exclusive use of French in class and focuses on communicative skills, fostering a highly interactive class in which the language is contextualized and emphasis is placed on meaning as well as forms.

Course Grade:

 

  1. Tests 65% (quizzes 30%, midterm 10%, final 10%, verb quizzes 5%, compositions 10%)
  2. Oral performance 20% (interview 5%, participation 15%)
  3. Homework 15% (MyFrenchLab 15%)

Participation:

Learning a language in a classroom setting is meant to be a highly involved and interactive process. Regular attendance and active participation are essential for performing well and making steady progress. While students are only required to attend the first two days of classes in order to maintain registration, participation is impossible unless you continue to attend. The participation grade is calculated using a daily points system, where each day of class is worth 2 points (100 points total in Autumn 2017). Students earn 1 point for being present, and 1 point for participating actively. Depending on the day’s activities, active participation may include any and all of the following:

  • Being on time for class and ready to start;
  • Having your textbook and any other required materials for the day;
  • Completing all homework assignments on time;
  • Volunteering frequently during in-class activities;
  • Fully engaging in any group or individual work as directed by instructor;
  • Using French to the best of your ability;
  • Showing and maintaining a positive, respectful attitude toward your classmates, instructor and yourself.

Any use of racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, xenophobic, classist, or generally offensive language in class or submission of such material will not be tolerated.

***

Anyone who wishes to contest a grade on a particular assignment or exam must

consult his/her instructor within 7 days after the assignment was returned to them.

 

***

Academic Standards:

Students are expected to maintain a high standard of academic ethics, honesty and integrity.  Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to: plagiarism, cheating, harassment, and disruptive or offensive behavior (see statement above), and will not be tolerated.  Please refer to the University’s Student Conduct Code. Any student or situation found to be in violation of proper academic conduct will be addressed according to University policy.

Policy regarding cell phones and computers:

Please turn off your cell phone when you come to class.  Simply using the “vibrate” function is still distracting to other students.  Additionally, the use of electronics of any kind is not allowed in the classroom. Exceptions can be made for documented learning accommodations (see “Access and Accommodations” below).

Homework:

All workbook assignments will be done online via MyFrenchLab.  If you have purchased your textbook new through the University Bookstore, it came with an access code.  If you bought your book used, you will have to purchase an access code by going to http://www.myfrenchlab.com.

Please refer to the last page of the syllabus for instructions on how to register for MyFrenchLab. 

Ø  MyFrenchLab is compatible with Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome and Apple Safari.

Ø  Before starting, please click on “Browser Tune-up” on the myfrenchlab.com homepage.

Ø  Please disable all pop-up blockers in your browser.  MyFrenchLab will not function properly if pop-ups are blocked.

Instructor-graded exercises must be turned-in as a hard-copy on the dates required by your instructor. All on-line exercises are due on the day of each exam by 8 am. Please refer to your calendar on MyFrenchLab.

In addition, students may be given other worksheets and written assignments.

Punctual submission of assignments is required. No late work will be accepted.

Compositions:

There will be four compositions, which will be done in-class on the day of the Quiz, with a second draft to be completed at home.

For the in-class portion of the composition, students will not be allowed to use supplementary resources (such as books, dictionaries, or on-line resources).   For the take-home rewrite, students should not use automated translation engines from the internet, nor can they ask a tutor to look over their compositions before turning them in.  Should a student be suspected to have received outside help, he/she will be given a zero for the correction portion of the grade.

 

Final Exam:                   

In the French 100 program, final exams are comprehensive, covering everything studied up to that point at the 100 level. Final exams will take place on the Saturday after the last day of classes. Please ignore what your MyUW indicates regarding the final exam date for this course.

 

 

Oral Grade:

The oral grade will focus on participation, oral performance in class, as well as on an oral interview which will be scheduled during the quarter and given by appointment in your instructor’s office. If you are unable to keep your appointment, it is your responsibility to notify your instructor in advance to reschedule the interview.

 

Tests, Quizzes and Grades:

Tests must be taken on the dates and times indicated on the syllabus. In addition, each instructor will schedule a number of verb quizzes.  Instructors are not required to give make-up tests. If you know ahead of time that you will have to miss a test, please notify your instructor and make appropriate alternative arrangements. The arrangements are at the discretion of the instructor.

 

Policy Regarding Student Concerns:

Please see your instructor about your concerns as soon as possible. If you are not satisfied with the response you receive, you may contact Hedwige Meyer, French 100 Coordinator, in Padelford C-248 or at

hedwige@uw.edu. If you are still not satisfied with the response you received, you may contact Geoffrey Turnovsky, Chair, in Padelford C-255 or at gt2@uw.edu. For your reference, these procedures are posted on the French Studies Bulletin Board, next to Padelford C-254.

 

Access and Accommodations: 

Your experience in this class is important to us, and it is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law. Disability Resources for Students (DRS) offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students experiencing a wide range of temporary and permanent disabilities and/or health conditions that may impact their ability to perform well in the classroom. These include but are not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts. If you are experiencing any such difficulties, please contact DRS as soon as possible. Once you have established accommodations, please submit them to your instructor at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs and success in this course.

 

Other Resources: 

Health and Wellness – (206) 543-2684 – Health and Wellness is a starting point for students in distress and in need of multiple levels of support. We provide intervention, assessment and consultation to students directly and work with faculty/staff to respond to incidents that cause concern in the classroom or beyond. We are not mental health providers but we do work closely with partners like the Counseling Center and Hall Health to make sure students are connected to services when appropriate.

The Counseling Center – (206) 543-1240 – Our staff of psychologists and mental health counselors are available to provide culturally-responsive short-term counseling to students, as well as serving as a consultation and outreach resource for the entire UW community.  All UW Seattle students who are in degree-seeking programs are eligible for our counseling services. No matter where you are from, who you worship, or who you love – if you need to talk, we are here for you.

Hall Health Mental Health – (206) 543-5030 – Hall Health’s Mental Health Clinic provides a high-quality, evidence-based care to UW students, including individual and group counseling and medication evaluation and management. As a student, you are eligible for no-cost drop-in appointments for mental health referrals, as well as light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Not all services are no-cost, but HHMH accepts most major insurance carriers.

UW Leadership Without Borders – (206) 685-630 – The LWB Center works to serve and empower undocumented students at the University of Washington. LWB offers leadership development resources, college success navigators, the Husky Dream Lending Library, a space for community building, and connections to other campus and community resources.

 

Syllabus

Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Sept 25

Point de Départ

Point de Départ

Point de Départ

Oct 2

Point de Départ

Unité 1

Unité 1

Unité 1

Unité 1

Oct 9

Unité 1

Unité 1

Quiz 1

Composition

Unité 2

Unité 2

Oct 16

Unité 2

Unité 2

Unité 2

Unité 2

Unité 2

Oct 23

Unité 2

Quiz 2

Composition

Unité 3

Unité 3

Unité 3

Oct 30

Unité 3

Unité 3

Unité 3

Unité 3

Unité 3

Nov 6

Review (1-3)

Midterm

Unité 4

Unité 4

HOLIDAY

Nov 13

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Unité 4

Nov 20

Unité 4

Quiz 4

Composition

Unité 5

HOLIDAY

HOLIDAY

Nov 27

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Dec 4

Unité 5

Unité 5

Unité 5

Quiz 5

Composition

Review (1-5)

                                   

                                            Final exam: Saturday Dec 9 2017, 8:30-10:30AM                      

                                                                                   

The numbers indicate the chapter unit to be covered that day.  Students are expected to complete the online exercises that correspond to the lesson covered in class that day. 

 

Text:                                                                                           Flumian, et al.                          Rond-Point, Textbook, 2nd edition.       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of French and Italian Studies

Grading Scale for Language Courses – No Curve

 

Percentage

Point

Letter

100-96.5

96.4-94.5

94.4-92.5

4.0

3.9

3.8

A

92.4-91.5

91.4-90.5

90.4-89.5

3.7

3.6

3.5

 

A-

89.4-88.5

88.4-87.5

87.4-86.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

 

B+

86.4-85.5

85.4-84.5

84.4-83.5

3.1

3.0

2.9

 

B

83.4-82.5

82.4-81.5

81.4-80.5

80.4-79.5

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.5

 

B-

79.4-78.5

78.4-77.5

77.4-76.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

 

C+

76.4-75.5

75.4-74.5

74.4-73.5

2.1

2.0

1.9

 

C

73.4-72.5

72.4-71.5

71.4-70.5

70.4-69.5

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

 

C-

69.4-68.5

68.4-67.5

67.4-66.5

1.4

1.3

1.2

 

D+

66.4-65.5

65.4-64.5

64.4-63.5

1.1

1.0

0.9

 

D

63.4-62.5

62.4-59.5

0.8

0.7

D-

59.4-0.0

0.0

E

 

 

 

 

Department of French and Italian Studies

C-254 Padelford Hall

Box 354361

Seattle, WA 98195-4361

 

(rev. 10/9/2016)

 

 

 

Français 100


Pour corriger vos compositions, consultez la liste suivante :

 

Symbole

Erreur

Exemple incorrect

Exemple corrigé

 

 

orth

 

spelling/orthographe

 

vielle

 

vieille

g

genre

le maison

la maison

conj

conjugaison

Elles partissent

Elles partent

acc

accord

une fille charmant

une fille charmante

voc

vocabulaire

Il prend un examen

Il passe un examen

trp

mot en trop

je parle de le l’avenir

je parle de l’avenir

pro

pronom

avec il

avec lui

prep

préposition

J’essaie à comprendre

J’essaie de comprendre

s/pl

singulier/pluriel

les courages

le courage

co

contraction

je mange de le chocolat

je mange du chocolat

md

mal dit

Je suis sûr que j’ai raison

Je suis sûre d’avoir raison

synt

syntaxe (ordre des mots)

Il n’a fait rien

Il n’a rien fait

art

article

Elle mange le gâteau

Elle mange du gâteau

om/ X

omission

Rien __ va mal

Rien ne va mal

tv

temps du verbe

Je pars hier

Je suis parti hier.

aux

auxiliaire

J’ai parti

Je suis parti

maj

majuscule

en france

en France

min

minuscule

un professeur Allemand

un professeur allemand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GETTING STARTED WITH MyFrenchLab

STEP 1: BEFORE YOU REGISTER

  1. Browser Tune-up: Visit www.myfrenchlab.com or www.mylanguagelabs.com and click on ‘Browser Tune-up’ to confirm that you have met the Systems Requirements. It is only necessary to do this once per computer. If you have already completed the tune-up, skip to Step 2.

 

STEP 2: REGISTER FOR YOUR COURSE

 

  1. Confirm that you have the following needed to register:
  2. VALID EMAIL ADDRESS
  3. STUDENT ACCESS CODE. The code is printed inside the Student Access Kit or provided when access is purchased online.
  4. YOUR COURSE ID: (See page 1 of syllabus)
  5. Go to: www.mylanguagelabs.com

 

  1. First-time users: Click on ‘Register’ and follow the registration instructions. Click on the Student Registration Tutorial to view a step-by-step tutorial on how to register and sign-in to your course
    1. If you have ever used a Pearson on-line product (mySpanishlab, myMathlab, etc.) and have already set-up an account, on the ACCESS INFORMATION page, click ‘Yes’ for ‘Do you have a Pearson Education Account?’  Enter login and password.
    2. If you do not already have an account, click ‘No’ and create login name and password.
    3. Once you have chosen a login and password, enter the STUDENT ACCESS CODE found in your RondPoint Access kit (the small, white flyer).

 

  1. Account Information:
    1. If you already have a Pearson account, verify that the information is to date. 
    2. If you do not have an account, fill out the required information.
    3. The Zip code for the University of Washington is 98195.
    4. Click ‘Next.’

 

  1. Confirmation & Summary:
    1. To access the website, click on the FIRST ‘Log In’, NOT the log in for the legacy courses.

 

  1. Enroll in a Course: Click on ‘Enroll in Course’ and enter the Course code provided by your instructor.
    1. Click on ‘Confirm.’
    2. Click on ‘Enter Course Now.’

 

STEP 3: LOG IN TO YOUR COURSE

 

After registering, log-in to MFL at www.myfrenchlab.com or www.mylanguagelabs.com by clicking on the ‘Login’ button.

 

*ATTENTION: Do not click on the “Log in to a legacy course” link that is just under the Log In button.

 

 

 

 

Composition Profile

 

Student                                                                     Date                                             Topic/Comp #

 

 

Criteria                                                                                                                                                                              Score

Form

20–18       Excellent to Very Good:  relevant to assigned topic; adequate length and development to topic; subject is coherent and well developed; demonstrated knowledgeable language use; proper use of connectors

  17-15       Good to Average:  some demonstrated language knowledge; mostly relevant to topic but lacks detail/development

  14-10       Fair to Poor:  limited demonstrated language use; inadequate length/development to topic; lacking substance

      9-0       Very Poor:  does not show adequate use of learned structures; not pertinent; OR not enough to evaluate

 

Vocabulary

  10–9        Excellent to Very Good: effective word choice and use of known vocabulary; very few or no errors, correct spelling

   8 -7            Good to Average: occasional errors of word form choice/usage but meaning not obscured

       7-6            Fair to Poor:  limited use of range of vocabulary; frequent errors of word form choice/usage; meaning confused or obscured

    5-0            Very Poor:  essentially direct translation; little knowledge of vocabulary demonstrated, word form choice/usage; OR not enough to evaluate

 

Grammar

  10–9          Excellent to Very Good: effective constructions; very few errors of spelling, agreement, tense, number, word order/function, articles, pronouns, prepositions

    8-7           Good to Average: occasional errors of spelling, agreement, tense, number, word order/function, articles, pronouns, prepositions, but meaning seldom obscured

    7-6           Fair to Poor:  major problems in construction; frequent errors of spelling, agreement, tense, number, word order/function, articles, pronouns, prepositions, and or fragments, run-­‐ons; meaning confused or obscured

     5-0            Very Poor:  no demonstrated mastery of sentence construction rules; dominated by errors; does not communicate; meaning confused or obscured

 

First Draft Grade

_____ /40

 

Correction

   10–9       Excellent to Very Good: complete correction of errors marked by the instructor

         8       Good to Average: Some errors not corrected according to instructor guidance OR modifications made beyond errors indicated by the instructor on the original composition

         7       Fair to Poor:  Many errors not corrected according to instructor guidance OR modifications made beyond errors indicated by the instructor on the original composition

      6-0       Very Poor:  Few to no errors corrected according to instructor guidance OR modifications made beyond errors indicated by the instructor on the original composition

 

Comments

Final Grade

_____ /50

 

 

 

University of Washington French Language Levels and Proficiency Targets

 

 

101 – A1

102/103 – A2

201/202/203 – B1

301/302/303 – B2

 

UNDERSTANDING

Listening

I can recognize familiar words and very basic phrases concerning myself, my family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.

I can understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local area, employment). I can catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements.

I can understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. I can understand the main point of many radio or TV programs on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.

I can understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar. I can understand most TV news and current affairs programmed. I can understand the majority of films in standard dialect.

 

Reading

I can understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.

 

I can read very short, simple texts. I can find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, prospectuses, menus and timetables and I can understand short simple personal letters.

I can understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job- related language. I can understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters.

I can read articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems in which the writers adopt particular attitudes or viewpoints. I can understand contemporary literary prose.

 

 

 

 

 

SPEAKING

Spoken Interaction

I can interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help me formulate what I’m trying to say. I can ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.

I can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. I can handle very short social exchanges, even though I can’t usually understand enough to keep the conversation going myself.

I can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. I can enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events).

 

I can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible. I can take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, accounting for and sustaining my views.

 

Spoken Production

I can use simple phrases and sentences to describe where I live and people I know.

 

I can use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms my family and other people, living conditions, my educational background and my present or most recent job.

 

I can connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, my dreams, hopes and ambitions. I can briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. I can narrate a story or relate the plot of a book or film and describe my reactions.

I can present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to my field of interest. I can explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

 

 

WRITING

Writing

I can write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings. I can fill in forms with personal details, for example entering my name, nationality and address on a hotel registration form.

I can write short, simple notes and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate need. I can write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.

 

I can write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. I can write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

 

I can write clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects related to my interests. I can write an essay or report, passing on information or giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view. I can write letters highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences.

 

Catalog Description: 
Development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to a basic level of proficiency. Teaches students to communicate in French and understand the cultural context of the language. Methods and objectives are primarily oral-aural. Oral practice in the language laboratory is required. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: FL placement test score of 0-14 only needed if French is the language of admission or if previous credit for French appears on transcript. If you have never taken French you do not need to take the placement exam.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
November 14, 2017 - 10:31pm
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